“Abang Yee who hails from Kelantan is a burger seller and has been in the business for more than 10 years…”

“His daily business routine starts in the evening from 7pm to 3 am.

Abang Yee sleeps after he sends his children to school. He earns RM300 a day and would get even more if there are big orders from the companies near where his stand is.

He used to have 2 more franchises but has been sold to other people. Amongst the interesting experiences that he has had was when Abang Yee had large orders and at the same time he ran out of gas to cook.

To those who want to start selling burgers, his advice is you have to be honest and trustworthy”.

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Story contributed by Ekamil Razali.

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on October 10th 2016)

“I’ve been working here for 10 years. I always wake up at 4am in the morning, and finish work at 3pm…”

People close their shops already but I still have many more to sell. I don’t keep count how many hours I sleep, I’m just very tired when I get back home. I don’t remember what time I sleep. That’s my life!”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on June 1st 2016)

“It’s a family business. I am 49 years old and I love my job…”

“I took this job from my dad, and I started helping him since I was 7 years old. This wet market has changed a lot. Many things have changed. The area has changed. But we still sell. My son he’s doing something else. He doesn’t want to be a butcher like his dad.

“When do usually you experience the most crowds, and how many pieces of meat would you cut everyday? 

“During Hari Raya Aidilfitri. It depends on everyday demand. In a day we cut one meat and if we have orders to supply for catering and hotels it will be more than one. A lot of people like lamb.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on May 31st 2016)

“l came to Malaysia three years ago from New Zealand to help start up a number of Boat Noodle outlets…”

“I’m a slow learner, so far I only know like four words in Bahasa. Anyway… as of now, we have nine outlets around the country.

“I visited Thailand during my time in Southeast Asia and I can safely say there is nothing like authentic Thai boat noodle served from the fishermen’s sampans. We needed Malaysians to know what they were missing out on, and therefore the idea of Boat Noodle restaurants was formed. We try our best to exact the quality of the original Thai noodles but it’s difficult when you need to quality control nine restaurants. This wasn’t always me, however. My father, being the typical Indian, wanted me to become an engineer or lawyer. So l studied law and l was a practicing lawyer in NZ for a few years. 

“Then I broke the news to him that I was interested in public relations and marketing. My dad’s response was, in a thick Indian accent, “Marketing? Isn’t that a fancy word for advertising with billboards and all that nonsense?” 

I said “Yes, but dad l want to become an entrepreneur”. My father thought l wanted to be the manual labourer putting up the billboards!”

– Story contributed by Giovanni Anil Gerard!

Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on September 19th 2015)