“My late father was an MCA member. He joined MCA when he was 20 years old, in the 1950s when it was first founded…”

“He might be disappointed if he saw what happened. But I’m sure he will understand that this had to happen for our next generation.

If BN continued ruling the country, the consequences might have been worse, but I don’t see hope under them. They have ruled for 60 years. When somebody is holding a thing for too long, they will think that it is completely theirs and they own it. 

Tun Mahathir inspired me the most during this election. He built something great for the country back then. I have good faith in Mahathir. 

This time we (the people) show them what we want. We decide what we want. 

I consider the polling day the luckiest day for Malaysia. Even though I voted, I wasn’t sure who was going to win. I just tried my best. I seriously never thought that this would happen, and I’m sure other Malaysians felt the same. 

But I see hope and I see a future where Malaysia will change for the better. This is what the young generation needs. 

I hope the younger generation can be brave and step up to do what they should do. Parents are not going to accompany us until the end. If we want a better environment for our next generation, we must decide for ourselves based on what we think is right”.

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Amalina Davis and Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on May 11th 2018)

“This is my old jacket and I seldom wear this, but I am in the mix of a sad and happy mood…”

“Sad because I lost the elections in Kota Bharu, but I want to have a ceria (joyful) mood, that’s why I choose this.

In my view, there were so many differences, two sides to it. Pakatan had a chance to win and BN too if there was no competition with PAS. 

PAS was a determining factor but because UMNO had coaxed them out of the Opposition, into a three corner fight, the votes was split, and in the end it worked in favour of Pakatan. A two-sided fight is better for a bigger majority win in parliament, but the three corner fight was the wrong strategy for BN. 

In the end, if you don’t feel the heat of the political and economic ambitions of the people, they won’t have rallied behind us.The biggest struggle came from the people. We are the servants of the people and the people made a choice.” 

___________________________________________

Husam Musa is the Vice-president of Parti Amanah Negara. In the 14th General Elections, he lost the Kota Bharu parliamentary seat and the Salor state seat to PAS candidates in Kelantan. 

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Christine C
Edited by Mushamir and Amalina

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(This post was first published on May 11th 2018)

“We’ve been in this fight for 20 years. That’s more than half my life. Words can’t really describe how I feel – it’s still so surreal…”

“If you see what they’ve done to us, the kind of things they’ve done to Anwar, to Wan Azizah, to Nurul Izzah, to all our leaders in PKR. But we’re not here to exact revenge. We’re here to change Malaysia.

We are completely elated and extremely thankful, that despite the gerrymandering, despite the phantom voters that I personally discovered in Lembah Pantai, despite the movement of voters in and out of Lembah Pantai, despite the presence of Bukit Aman – we made it. 

I feel tired, and I lost my voice from all the campaigning yesterday. I want to find my voice again, but in a way, I have found a different voice, a voice for Malaysians. 

I’m ready to start work. I think we have a lot of work ahead of us. I think there’s a lot of things that needs to change. I’m really excited about the things we plan to do. Malaysia will change for the better. 

“What is your message to Malaysians?”

Believe. Let us believe again.” 

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa and Amalina Davis

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(This post was first published on May 10th 2018)

(2/2) “Its normal lah with politicians – when it comes to elections, that’s when they will paint the houses, visit the people, and build new playgrounds…”

(2/2) “Before, this playground was broken down, and the kids just played anyways and risked being hurt. Now the PPR condominiums have a brand new paint job because of the elections.

Also, the elevator hasn’t been working for so long, so we have to take the stairs all the way from the 17th floor. We were provided with Chinese-branded elevator brands which breaks down easily – and these lifts are shaking, falling down, and getting stuck. Its a simple thing, but it affects our standard of living here at PPR. 

To be clear, Malaysia’s political system doesn’t work and must be changed. Whether its the Opposition or Government, they are all the same, but I hope that someone can look into our problems here. 

Its a good thing that you guys (Humans of KL) come to places like this and write our stories out.”

————————————————————————–

(2/2) “Biasalah orang-orang politik ni – bila dah dekat dengan pilihan raya, masa itulah nak cat rumah, nak lawat rakyat, nak buat taman permainan baru. Kalau tak, taman permainan ni dibiarkan je rosak macam tu, budak-budak yang datang main pun terdedah dengan bahaya. Sekarang PPR ni dapat cat baru sebab pilihan raya.

Lif di sini dah lama rosak, kami terpaksa gunakan tangga untuk naik sampai ke tingkat 17. Kami diberi lif dari China yang bermasalah – lif goyang, cepat rosak dan selalu tersangkut. Nampak macam isu remeh, tapi sangat bagi kesan dalam kehidupan seharian kami di PPR ini.

Sebenarnya politik Malaysia ni tak jalan pun dan perlu diubah. Tak kiralah pembangkang atau kerajaan, dua-dua sama je, tapi saya sangat berharap ada orang yang dapat ambil peduli masalah kami di sini.

Kami sangat bersyukur kamu (Humans of KL) datang tempat macam ni dan tulis cerita kami.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

*The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewees and do not reflect the official policy or position of Humans of Kuala Lumpur.

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa and Amalina Davis
Translated by Khairul Ridhwan

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(This post was first published on May 3rd 2018)

“Vote for the government if you don’t want the “Semenanjung mentality” to spread in Sarawak” – that’s the general message of the government to the people ever since I was a kid…”

“If you don’t know what ‘Semenanjung mentality’ is, just think of the people who love to create chaos, riots and burn things to the ground. Yes, this is the picture painted by the government in everyone’s head. This is divide and conquer at its best.

This is the mentality that I have had since I was a kid till the day I flew to Semenanjung to further my studies.

Then I finally saw the truth. The people in Semenanjung are no different than us in Sarawak. They are friendly and kind just like us. But most importantly, they have access to the truth.

They know the extent of injustice and corruption that is happening in our country. This part was not made available to most Sarawakians and Sabahans. Since their news source are national radio and TV, which are controlled by the state. So they only get one view about our country, and that is the good side of the government and the bad side of opposition.

And it still happens to this day.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewees and do not reflect the official policy or position of Humans of Kuala Lumpur.

Photostory by Amalina Davis
Edited by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on May 2nd 2018)

(1/2) “I am from Sarawak and in my hometown, it’s common to receive a bribe of RM50, RM100 or even more from ‘some officer’ to vote for the government…”

(1/2) “Sometimes, the bribery is not even in monetary form, but in forms of rice, powdered milk or other basic necessities. It has happened at every election and it will happen again this time.

I am of Iban descent and my grandparents live in a longhouse. Everytime there’s elections, the government will go to these rural longhouses by 4WD or boat, just to give these basic necessities.

They will also bribe the ‘tuai rumah’ (leader of longhouse), so the ‘tuai rumah’ can influence longhouse residents to support the government. Even my parents look forward to the elections, because they will get money for voting for the government.

As a kid, I couldn’t wait to grow up so I can get money by voting for the government too! 

And most people love that. Sadly, they don’t know the impact of their actions. It’s never about the welfare of the people. It’s all about winning and staying in power.

Still, I don’t believe that the opposition is any better. They have their fair share of dirty tricks and tactics to ensure their winnings as well.

But one thing is for sure, I simply want change for my country. So go out there and vote for what you believe is the change that you and your people need. May God bless us and our country.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewees and do not reflect the official policy or position of Humans of Kuala Lumpur.

Photostory by Amalina Davis
Edited by Mushamir Mustafa

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“I am 33 years old but I have never voted in the General Elections. To be honest, I have not even registered as a voter after all these years…”

“The people we vote for are supposed to serve the ‘rakyat’. They are supposed to bow down to the needs of the people, because we are the ones who put them there. That is the whole point of a democratic system. But I don’t see that in either sides, whether its the Government or the Opposition. They seem to be in politics to serve their own needs.

Until I see a leader from either side that has the people’s best interest at heart, I refuse to participate in this so-called democracy.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

*The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the interviewees and do not reflect the official policy or position of Humans of Kuala Lumpur.

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

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(This post was first published on May 1st 2018)

“I’m scared that my vote would be rejected”

“I’m scared that my vote would be rejected if I didn’t mark the voting paper correctly so last night (Monday May 7) I practiced marking on a piece of paper.

Tonight (May 8), I will be hanging around with my JKKK committee who will be teaching villagers and first time voters how to mark properly.

Its fun joining in the campaigns because I get to hangout with my friends.”

Seen in Hulu Langat on May 8, 2018

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photo and story by Irene Yap
Edited by Christine C

The above interview was conducted in Malay.

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(This post was first published on May 15th 2018)