“We ask if the government can provide more long term homeless shelters to accommodate more people,’ he disclosed his wish…”

(Teddy Bear Doctor speaking) “We also realize that tuberculosis patients mingle around with the others and it’s easily spread. The homeless already have low immunity.

‘We need more jobs for the homeless people too, and have employers accept them. it’s impossible to eradicate homeless people. The more who go out, the more who come here.”

(Part 3/3)

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on August 9th 2016)

“We used to take care of a lot of orphanages and senior citizens in old folks home, but we realize most of them are getting enough help from the public…”

(Teddy Bear Doctor speaking) “Then 2.5 years ago I joined Kechara Soup Kitchen as a doctor as I volunteered every Saturday night, and realized that we can do more to take care of poor families that need medical care and cannot afford treatment by going to their houses.

They are selected after we interview them, to see if they are really in need of medical help.

Cases are evaluated individually where for example, the father is an OKU, or he cannot work – but if the father is just lazy and seems fit, we take it on a case basis.

These homeless people are from this area and for families that need help we’ll go to their house, wherever they are we’ll try to find time to visit them, … even if that means going all the way to Seremban or Penang.

One of the families we are visiting is in Sentul, whose father is paralysed from the waist below, and the wife is semi paralyzed, where she can walk, but with ‘help’. So we’ve been helping them monthly since last year, providing medication, groceries, and also a caterer to give them food on a daily basis. He had to go to the hospital thrice a week and there are costs involved. These people have no pensions as they are in their early 40’s, except for the little monthly welfare aid from the government”. 

(Part 2/3)

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on July 28th 2016)

“I’m just exhausted. I started work today at 3pm, in the Emergency room. And then the next day I am on-call after that…”

“For a doctor, on-call means we work 36 hour shifts – one day and a half straight away. Despite being busy I still make time to be a part-time doctor at Teddy Mobile Clinic

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on August 8th 2016)

“His father is 65 years’ old and cannot work, and his mother is ill…”

(Volunteer from the Teddy Mobile Clinic speaking) “Every month they get RM300 from the Majikan (welfare department) and RM300 cannot pay for the whole family.”

“So every night they’ll get food from the Soup Kitchen, and around the afternoon they will walk around, and if they get a short job, they will get paid. So if they didn’t get any job and any money, they’ll just get the food from the Soup Kitchen – it’s their meal for the whole day. He’s 5 years old and his brother is 8 years.” 

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on August 8th 2016)

“The bus accident changed my life. I was a bus driver for Plusliner, but after the crash, I lost my job, and my ability to do work and am now living on the streets…”

The accident happened at Machap, Melaka. The tire exploded and the bus crashed into the telephone pole and divider. The air system also failed, and a bus relies on the air system for its brakes and to open the doors – without it I couldn’t do anything.

As we crashed the cars at the back also hit us. The front mirror and side view mirror cut my face, my lips, and my tongue. My backbone was also injured.

And two passengers died that night as well. 

That was when I realized I cannot work anymore. 

The thing is it’s hard to have a family when you cannot work and have no income. My wife works at a prison at Seremban and her pay is not enough for the family, what more I am just a bus driver who now is out of work.

So I was forced to leave home, and I made that decision. Within the first 6 months, I couldn’t do much jobs with my condition so I took up security guard jobs. Last time as a bus driver I would get RM1800 but as a guard, it’s terrible, it’s only RM700-800 a month.

The rent for a room is already easily RM400 – the money simply isn’t enough.

Not long after my wife asked her sister to meet up with me and get the divorce papers signed. She shouldn’t have gotten involved, but that’s how my wife wanted to communicate, she was asking for a divorce. So it happened and the process was automatic. 

The worst part about the jobs now is that you work 3, 4 months but in the end they don’t pay the salary. And we can’t protect ourselves – its up to them if they want or don’t want to pay. 

It’s not that I don’t want to work, there is just no chance to work. I would do any odd jobs for people – paint for them, wash clothes or clean a stall – and I’m OK, especially if accommodation is provided.

I’m now 58 years old, I’m not young anymore. Old people can’t do as much as young people.When I was younger at 30 I wasn’t like this. I was busy looking for money, I bought a house, a car…. but now I gave it all to my children, and I decided I should just not be a burden and leave (home).

I know that I’m old but I don’t want to be depending or asking people or my family and sons for help, I have to stand on my own.

And my sons, being a man – you know lah, they are closer to their mothers than their dads. 

During Ramadan I still fast, and I break my fast at the mosque and I’m thankful there’s food but it’s so little, and it’s the only thing I eat for the day. Sahur was harder as there’s not much food going around.

Now my only concern is not to die in the street,and to be able to sustain myself. Saya pun tak tau berapa lama lagi nak hidup (and I don’t know how much longer I have to live). I’m already old, it’s hard to find jobs and be paid after doing it and I don’t want to be a burden to my family. I will be happy if I could have a job where there’s an accommodation, and a place to stay even if it pays RM 1000. But for now, for now I am on the streets”. 

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

(He didn’t want his face to be shown, doesn’t want his children to know that he’s homeless.. So I took a photo of the lower part of his face….you can see the part where his lips got cut. Gave him some of my pocket money, and he said that it would cover his food for the next few days.) 

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on July 29th 2016)

For those wondering here’s a description of what happens at Teddy Mobile Clinic

The meeting point is usually situated at Jalan Hang Lekiu, in front of Segi College, KL. They usually meet up at 9.30 pm to set up shop – a collection of makeshift tables and chairs all methodically placed – as if they have been doing this many, many times already.

There are makeshift tables for the clinic’s new clients who register under Kechara Soup Kitchen Society, a charitable non-profit organization inspired by H.E. Tsem Rinpoche to help the needy and marginalized community.

There are also makeshift tables for returning patients all arranged on the sidewalk of the street.

After a patient registers, they move on to another table where their blood pressure and sugar level are checked, and then they go to designated tables for their doctor’s consultation, all free of charge.

After seeing the doctors, they move on to the pharmacist’s table to collect their medicines.

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on July 28th 2016)

“I volunteer because of two things…”

“It is like the gathering of some of the most positive and kindest people (volunteers) in this city and also it’s a weekly reminder for me to be grateful for what I have in my life by being up close with people who have literally nothing.”

– Humans of Kuala Lumpur

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on July 28th 2016)

These are some of the volunteers at the Teddy Mobile Clinic

Who also work full time jobs. I can’t remember exactly what were their job titles, but one is working at a company selling fire doors, one is a writer, the other is a personal assistant in an architectural firm and they all have work the next day.

Photostory by Mushamir Mustafa

Do you have a story? Let us know here: https://forms.gle/ht4HsvbxgSgcKS5h8

 

(This post was first published on July 28th 2016)